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global initiative, business and government and ngo s were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was iran and nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as oppose
announced in advance, will be three on the economy and e each on health care, the role of government, and governing with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama and governor romney. ( applause ) >> jim. >> lehrer: gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start with the economy, segment one, and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes, each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss is determined, mr. president, you go first. >> well, thank you very much, jim, for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lot of points i want to make tonight but the most impor
, or tax cuts for the rich, slashing government, slashing help for precisely those who need it, slashing government's role in infrastructure, in science and technology, would take us so far away from what we need, i wish president obama had the revenues to do more, but it is the republican side that is blocking that because that party has one idea only. and that is to cut taxes for the rich. we have this multi-brazilian there running for office. his money is in the cayman island. he pays 13% in taxes. he says the most important thing is to cut the tax rates at the top for the. it is mind-boggling that we have this kind of blatant candidacy. people are hurting, people are upset. that is why this weirdness even has a choice. but it would take as exactly in the wrong direction. president obama could have done more and would have done more if the republican opposition had not blocked the end of the bush era tax cuts for the rich, for example. so romney is in quite a position to be blaming president obama for that when it is exactly this side that has made the kind of recovery we need so flee
a woman and her children. tonight, turkey announced it had already fired back. the turkish government is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a l
is trickle-down government and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> reporter: romney's reception at the event was reinforced by instant polling that he won last night's encounter by more than 2-1. but at an obama rally in denver, the president charged romney had repeatedly misrepresented his own positions on jobs and taxes. >> so you see the man on stage last night, he does not want to be held accountable for the real mitt romney's decisions and what he's been saying for the last year. and that's because he knows full well that we don't want what he's been selling for last year. (cheers and applause) governor romney may dance around his positions but if you want to be president, you yes to american people the truth. >> woodruff: the president's campaign hit that note again and again, insisting romney had not changed the dynamics of the race, even as they argued he had played fast and loose with the truth. david axelrod spoke on msnbc. >> the problem isn't with his debate performance the problem is with his underlying the
so many stupid things but one thing was interesting, he said to control it, to govern the italians is not difficult. it is impossible. so in that situation like that, it would have been impossible to control anything. so i left. >> rose: so you left. >> and then i became a free bird. >> rose: and how did that feel? >> fantastic. it was fantastic. because i had been music director all my life since 1968, in florence. london philharmonic, philadelphia orchestra after armandi,bascala, so after so many years of hard work, not only artistically and musically, but all of the other things that music -- a good and honest music director is to take care of, i worked so hard, that certainly i felt -- i feel light, i have to do only music when i want, where i want, and how i want, i was, i felt like a bird, a as i said before, ligero, and that's when the philadelphia philharmonic asked me to be the music director. i did several concerts, many concerts with th the philharmonc and beautiful concerts, i admire those musicians. i think they are very good, and they have, i have wonderful memories,
don't pay taxes and, in his words, are dependent on government, so he couldn't worry about them and their votes. >> in this case, i said something that's just completely wrong. and i absolutely believe, however, that my life has shown that i care about the 100% and that has been demonstrated throughout my life. this whole campaign is about the 100%. when i become president, it'll be about helping the 100%. >> brown: still, president obama was having none of it. >> from the day we began this campaign, we've always said that real change takes time. it takes more than one year or one term, or even one president. it takes more than one party. it certainly can't happen if you're willing to write off half the nation before you even take office. >> brown: with the economy dominating the campaign, and with 12 million americans still unemployed, it was clear the punching and counter-punching over jobs will only grow more intense. and there's still one more monthly employment report coming-- on november 2, four days before election day. to help break down the jobs numbers, i am joined by
passed overwhelmingly by republicans in states with republican legislatures and republican government. that includes efforts to crack down on voter registration drives, to make it harder for people to register by demanding proof of citizenship. that means cutting back on early voting. that requires the government- issued i.d. to cast a ballot. that prevents ex-felons from voting after they served their time. purging the voter rolls. these are all laws that have been passed by republicans and republican states. that is why the article was titled the gop war on voting. tavis: why are the republicans pushing this issue? what is the take away for them? >> if you ask republicans why they are pushing the issue, they will give you a two word response. voter fraud. if you ask me, it is because they looked at the 2008 election and they saw a massive turnout from young voters, hispanics, and african- americans, termed coalition of the ascendant. they said, this cannot happen again. the demographics are changing that if this coalition of the ascendant turns out in the same numbers in 2012 and go
of what a definition of prevention, a goal to which both governments agree what a definition would be in practice. >> woodruff: i was reading today there was disagreement inside netanyahu's own government that the israeli foreign ministry concludes that the economic sanctions are hitting iran hard calling for another round of economic sanctions. is that significant? >> the economic sanctions are hitting iran the iranian economy is in trouble and the reason why we haven't seen results with regard to the iranian negotiating position is that the p 5 plus 1 has not put on the table anything in the way-- the united states and the other five powers that have been negotiating have not put on the table significant sanctions related-- basically no sanctions relate other than the airplane parts. >> here i disagree with paul very much. the economic sanctions have been a wonderful success and an abysmal failure. they've been a success at raising the economic cost to the iranians but if their real goal is to compel the iranians to change the nuclear policy they've had no visible impact. so that
of government under the constitution. did congress exceed its law-making powers under the constitution when it enacted the health care law? what role do state governments have in enforcing immigration laws? this term a lot of the questions either on the docket or pending, whether the court will take them, really involve equality issues. issues arising under the equal protection act. >> brown: affirmative action is on the docket. >> it is. it's going to be argued next week. it involves the university of texas and whether it can use race as a factor in its admissions policy in order to increase diversity within its student body. >> brown: we're definitely going to look at that next week. but pending, as you say, as you used the word, same sex marriage. >> yes. there are seven petitions that have been filed in the court but they really break down into two cases. first, challenges involving the federal defense of marriage act, a key provision defines marriage for all federal purposes as between a man and a woman. and then the second set involves california's proposition 8. that proposition bann
of the highest. >> many of these workers face redundancy. the government says growth will return next year. others say the government has missed an opportunity to reduce state spending and make it easier to hire and fire workers. today's budget hearing reflects a deeper unresolved problem with the eurozone. as we have seen, other countries like spain and greece have been struggling to reduce spending even while their economies are weak or in recession. >> and other things europeans might envy in brazil, they have so much money in the government that response to the slowdown is a stimulus package that has been announced. in other news, ahead of britain posting a financial watchdog has announced a reform to the setting of libor, the benchmark interest rate. the review was commissioned after a fine was imposed on barclays for trying to rig the rate. now to nepal where a plane has crashed killing all 19 people on board. the aircraft caught fire within two minutes before taking off. it is the second fatal accident this year and once again the country's safety record is in the spotlight. >> a jo
over the years. there's two main categories they have. one is how to reduce the size of government, and the other half of it is this model legislation that's in the corporate good. in other words, there's a profit driven legislation. how can you open up a new market? how can you privatize something that can open up a market for a company? and between those two divisions you are kind of getting to the same end goal which is really kind of ultimate privatization of everything. >> mark pocan is something of an expert on alec. in fact, to learn as much about it as he could, he became a member. >> what i realized is if you join alec for a mere hundred dollars as a legislator you have the full access like any corporate member. >> he also took himself to an alec conference for a first-hand look. >> hi, i'm state representative mark pocan. welcome to my video blog. i'm outside the marriott on canal street in new orleans at the alec convention, american legislative exchange council. that was where you watch the interaction of a room full of lobbyists-free drinks, free cigars, wining, dining
, savings, and why the government cannot stop it. >> the prices of food, cheese, butter, milk and even fruit have witnessed an increase of 10% in the last two weeks. people are complaining about that. they are publicly complaining about this situation and they blame the situation on a ahmadinejad. >> today, he put the blame on western sanctions. >> it is very clear, iran is being pressurized. there are sanctions from the enemy telling other nations not to buy iranian oil. this is a secret war. the enemy thinks that with these sanctions, they can defeat iran. they cannot. it is a psychological war. "you can see how much trouble the currency is in. in a week, it has lost 1/3 of their value. what is the cause? as we heard, president ahmadinejad's critics say that he is to blame for bad management. he seemed to agree with the west, that finally there sanctions are beginning to have a real impact. in the last year, the oil exports have roughly halved at as a result of sanctions. would it slide toward economic collapse and bring about the outcome that the west would like? >> hardship might make pe
sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of the isn't family hoped. -- this is what is left of the family home. the families mother and children were sitting in the garden when the shell hit. >> we were eating and we heard the sound obama. the shrapnel fell, hit the wall and in the ground. we could have been killed. -- we heard the sound of the bomb. syria has apologized for the debts, but those of fear another accidental strike. >> we are scared to death. we don't know when another reporter is going to be fired. we are targets and we are really frightened by what is happening. >> this afternoon, the prime minister of turkey won approval from parliament for military operations inside syria. >> we just want peace and security in our region. this is what we care about. we have no intention to go to war. >> turkey is strong enough to protect its borders and no one should test that. >> to reinforce this point, the turkish military stations next to the border. some in this country are worried by where this may lead. tonight in a
: violence erupting this week in spain and greece over government austerity measures are reminders the european debt crisis is far from solved. today, spain unveiled its 2013 budget, promising more big budget cuts as the government tries to reduce its heavy deficit. as turmoil and tension in the euro-zone escalates, there remain questions about the longevity of the euro currency. today, italian prime minister mario monti said he doesn't think any country will leave the union. erika miller reports from new york. >> reporter: as italian prime minister mario monti left today's event, he dodged reporters and walked straight to a waiting car. earlier at the forum, it was a different story. calm, cool and collected, monti stayed carefully on message. he made it clear italy is better ofas part of the european union. >> the euro brought to italy a single currency, shared with all the others, that is very important economically. >> reporter: monti also emphasized the benefits of the common currency for other member countries, like germany. >> thanks to the euro, germany was able and is able
-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this model work really well, in massachusetts. because govern romney did a good thing, working with democrats in the state to set up what is essentially the identical model, and as a consequence, people are covered there. it hasn't destroyed jobs. when govern romney stood on the stage with other republican candidates for the nomination, and he was asked, would you take $10 of spending cuts for just $1 of r
-- all this while cutting tax rates and not changing the amount of money the federal government brings in. an analysis by the tax policy center shows governor romney will have to make some big tradeoffs. >> so, governor romney has made five promises. he can't keep them all. he is going to have to, at some point, abandon one of those promises. he cannot cut tax rates, cut taxes on the middle class, cut taxes on capital gains, and balance the budget all at once. >> reporter: romney advisers have said they would consider eliminating tax breaks on at least two forms of saving, life insurance and muni bonds. and the governor's supporters argue tax cuts generate enough growth to offset some of their cost. >> people can have reasonable disagreements about the magnitude of that growth effect, but to assume that it is zero, i think, is wrong. and once you relax that assumption, then, all of a sudden, other things start to be possible. >> reporter: but it's hard to be sure about the impact of tax cuts on the economy, which is why the experts in congress and the treasury who are responsible for esti
of the governments that have supported the opposition into one big category as foreign conspirators. this is a regime that has lost control over enormous parts of its territory over the last 18 months. much of its officer corps has defected. it has failed to suppress the revolution. it has lost control over major urban centers. it's very much on the defensive and this is its way of striking back i think by targeting every government that supports political change in syria as supporters of terror. >> now, you're working very closely with various members of the opposition. there's been a lot of drift simple that they lacked unity. we're not quite sure who they are yet. do you think that they're ready for government yet? >> there is still a significant level of competition and conflict within the syrian opposition. but on a number of issues, including the kind of post-assad future that the opposition is fighting for. we find significant convergence across different spectrums of the opposition that was evident in the work we did with them, it's evident in the work the group that the arab league has spons
. >> we want a government who will talk to the people. parliament must be chosen by the people of jordan. we are not against a king. we are protesting the way that the government and the parliament is performing. >> as many as 10,000 people took part in the protests today. the protests were by and large peaceful. at one stage, it seemed there were almost as many police and soldiers as protesters. we have seen at the tensions that have led to so much bloodshed, and that is perhaps why the muslim brotherhood, which was behind today's to ministration, said it will take part in the electoral process if the king delivers the electoral reforms he has processed. >> from protests in jordan to libya now where this week, a team of fbi agents arrived in benghazi to investigate the assault on the u.s. embassy last month in which four americans were killed. it comes at the same time state department e-mails were being revealed showing a request for the u.s. security team in benghazi, which was denied. >> according to these e-mails, they wanted to keep hold of a plane, which they had in libya. they sa
, education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: we continue this evening with matt damon and gary white, they are cofounders of water.org. >> and i heard these statistics that were jaw dropping about a child dying every 20 seconds because of lack of access to clean water and sanitation, that is, that to me is just staggering, because -- because to relate to that as an american, i mean, we don't know people who are thirsty, it just doesn't happen, right? you know, with away don't know kid who die from diarrhea. >> rose: water is ubiquitous. >> yes, of course, or cholera for that matter, just clean water. so, you know, so that was one side of it, just the mindless death and bono talks about stupid death, you know, because it is preventable. >> we have known how to make water safe for more than 100 years, right? imagine we discovered the cure for aids today, and 100 years from now 3.5 million people are still dying becau
? >> yes, indeed. >> rose: how about governance? >> honestly speaking, we still have problems and challenges when it comes to governance and the international community has committed itself to assisting the afghan government in capacity building so that the afghan government can provide basic services to the afghan people and step up the fight against corruption, etc. i had a talk with president karzai recently and he agreed that we must give top priority to that. and actually he has taken some measures to fight corruption. >> rose: and he's leaving-- there's a new election in 2014. he will be departing, we assume. >> yeah. and it's for the afghans to elect their leadership. but let me add to this that we have actually seen progress in the development of afghanistan. the economic growth is around 7% to 8% annually from low level, but it's quite impressive. more people have access to electricity. we see flourishing markets. the educational system has improved. eight million children go to school. more than one-third are girls. 30% of teachers are female teachers. the health sit
, but not on any resolution to the scheduled tax increases in government spending cuts. the nonpartisan tax policy center figures taxeses will go up by almost $3500 per household next year if certain tax cuts are allowed to expire. the report says 90% of households would see higher federal taxes. you can learn more about the fiscal cliff and why it matters, go to our website: www.nbr.com. nokia is on track to team up with major software-maker oracle. the finnish cell phone company is giving oracle access to its mapping services. financial details of the deal were not disclosed. but the move comes as nokia recently signed mapping deals with groupon, and amazon. last week apple's c.e.o. apologized for the shortcomings of its new map service. >> susie: and american express has agreed to pay millions of dollars in refunds to settle accusations from regulators that it deceived customers. the violations include: unlawful late fees, misleading consumers about debt collection, and age discrimination. amex will pay more than $100 million in fines, and give payouts to about 250,000 customers. consumers that
the financial crisis is another. and the growing government debt. that said, i mean i wouldn't underestimate the upside with the u.s. being such a creative economy. for example, energy prices have fallen a lot. and there are some other things you can count to on the upside. but so far businesses have been very reluctant to invest heavily, very reluctant to hire heavily. >> muhamed el-erian what do you see-- when you look at all this data coming in, what is most important to you? >> a few things. first the employment picture. and not just whether we're creating jobs or not. that's important. but also what's happening to those who remain unemployed. and that is a pretty worsening picture. that's why i call 2 a crisis. because long-term unemployment is really high. and youth unemployment is really high. and these are longer-term issues that we need to deal with. so the employment picture is very important. second, clarity for businesses. today no one has the confidence to invest. there is a ton of money, judy, on the sideline, a ton of money. and if we can engage that money in the system would
said the shelling came from syrian government forces. hours later, turkish artillery fired back, at unnamed targets inside syria. and, turkey's nato allies demanded an immediate halt to hostile action against the turks. meanwhile, three suicide car bombings killed at least 34 people in syria's embattled city of aleppo. the attack was on a government- controlled section. the coordinated explosions hit a central square, destroying a number of buildings and littering the streets with twisted metal and concrete. at least 122 people were wounded. and the death toll was expected to rise as crews work through the rubble. in iran, riot police and protesters came to blows over the collapse of the national currency. the rial has lost a third of its value in less than a week. today, merchants at tehran's main bazaar protested outside their stalls and closed for the day. exchange houses and currency websites also were closed down. in the end, police arrested money changers and fired tear gas to disperse crowds. the protesters charged president mahmoud ahmadinejad's policies have fueled the
in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically important? >> reporter: new rules may also push cash into unregulated investments or bank accounts. >> and putting even more money into the banking system and more burdens onto its insurance system seems to me the opposite direction from the way we want to be going when we are trying to solve the too big to fail problem. >> reporter: during the financial crisis, the treasury was forced to guarantee money market funds, a risk it doesn't want to take again. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. >> tom: u.s. stocks ended their best quarter today since 2010, despite some weakness today. investors locked in profits today after another set of disappointing economic data. a measure of business activity in the midwest fell to 49.7 in septmber from 53 in august, the first such contraction in three years. and a national gauge of consumer sentiment slipped to 78.3, after registering 79.2 earlier in the month. meanwhile, spain's banks got a passing grade
segment. three focus on the economy, four, five, and six health care, the role of government and governing. procedure, each candidate gets two minutes to respond to a question posed by jim lara. time remaining is given to freewheeling discussion of segments. risk factor, dangerous, sometimes lethal. ♪ [music] ♪ >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago? is america as respected throughout the world as it was? do you feel that our security is as safe, that we're as strong as we were four years ago? if you answer all of those questions yes, why then i think your choice is obvious as to who you'll vote for. if you don't agree, if you don't think that this course that we've been on for the last four years is what you would like to see us follow for the next four, then i could suggest another choice that you have. >> jimmy jimmy carter practical gagging. question, who will win the debate on tuesday? can romney pull a rea
. >> reporter: but government auditors report most federal job-training programs have not done the expensive studies needed to determine whether or not they are effective. and those that have done impact studies find only small or short-term benefits from job training. >> which i think is remarkable that, after five decades, that the main federal auditor, the g.a.o., can't really find that these programs work really well at all. >> reporter: but governor romney still talks up job training. he backs personal reemployment accounts that workers can use to find training and job counseling. and he wants states to take the lead, not the federal government. there are now 47 different federal training programs, and romney calls that duplication a waste. >> all that money, all that overhead-- what i want to do is take those dollars and bundle it up, send it back to nevada and say, "you train your people for the jobs the people of nevada need and want." >> reporter: most of those 47 programs are very small and they're aimed at groups like veterans and the poor. governor romney would replace them with
center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this movie before. massive tax cuts for the wealthy. eliminating restrictions on wall street. let the banks w
for -- i am going to dodge that question because i am not looking for a government job. this is a very straightforward but. i would be alienating some people. i decided it was more important to get the facts on the table so people could understand there were different perspectives and it could have been avoided and it can still be fixed if main street voters need to rise up and make this an issue. tavis: iraq -- a fact that you wrote it. -- i appreciate the fact that you wrote it. the book is called "bull by the horns." that is our show for tonight. thank you for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with jeffrey sachs. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completeliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmarcommitted $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunge
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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